Events

Events

History of the Hutong - walking tour

Event date:
03-22-2017 11:00 AM
Event End Date:
03-22-2017 01:30 PM
Capacity:
Unlimited
Individual Price:
¥260.00

Walk led by Lars Ulrik-Thom, of Beijing Postcards​ Follow Beijing Postcards into the curved Hutong alleyways around the Drum and Bell Towers of Beijing. Listen to stories of opium dens and vast mansions of former officials. Gain a profound understanding of old Beijing during a fun and interesting afternoon. Where: from Gulou to Nanluoguxiang starting North side of Drum Tower finishing at Beijing Postcards' gallery for ​drinks and time for more QA. ​39 Chaodao Hutong (炒豆胡同) the southern most Hutong between Nanluoguxiang and Jiaodaokou dajie -What is all the fuss about? Along the way we will discover lanes so narrow that not even the tricycle rickshaws will be able to reach us. We will hear about the incredible transformation of this area from high society dwellings, over workers accommodation, to the peculiar mixture of generals, workers, romantic foreign fools and politicians residing in the area today. What will happen to this area in the future? Is preservation a real option or will this area, in the very heart of Beijing, have to cave in to developers. After two hours in the Hutong you will be left with lots to ponder about, with a drink in one hand and some snacks in the other.  

 

 

 

 

 

 

Meeting Point: in front of the ticket office of Drum Tower.

Time: 11:00am - 13:30 pm
Price: ¥260

To reserve your spot, please email us at  beijingpostcards@gmail.com.

Beijing Arrivals: The History of Dashilan

Event date:
04-22-2017 02:00 PM
Event End Date:
04-22-2017 04:30 PM
Cut off date:
04-23-2017
Capacity:
Unlimited

“Old Beijing”- People often talk about the city as if it once existed in a pure, untouched version. But in reality Beijing has always been a city shaped by waves of migrants. It is difficult to find a better example of this than “Dashilan”, just southwest of the Qianmen Gate. For hundreds of years this area of Beijing was the ever-simmering melting pot of the capital. Dashilan was the place where people would first enter Beijing. Through hard labor, personal relations, money, skills or whatever they brought with them, newcomers would find their way into the urban society.

On April 22, 27, 30 and May 1 our public History Space in Dashilan will feature Jens Schott Knudsen’s portraits of three families living in Dashilan from our Beijing Arrivals project.On all of these dates we organize a walk in the area where you can meet some of our neighbors and hear about the many hundred years history of Dashilan.

Time: 14:00am - 16:30pm

Price: ¥100

To reserve your spot, please email - beijingpostcards@gmail.com

The Life of PuyI

Event date:
05-27-2017 02:30 PM
Event End Date:
05-27-2017 04:00 PM
Capacity:
Unlimited
Individual Price:
¥100.00
Location:
The Hutong
This November marked ninety years since the boy emperor, Puyi, finally left the Forbidden City. When the young, bespectacled monarch was finally expelled from his palace, it was also the end of the Imperial governance of the Forbidden City. Hundreds of eunuchs, acrobats, soldiers, servants, etc. followed the ex-monarch into the dusty streets of Beijing and the most important institution in Chinese history was abolished for good. The film “The Last Emperor” is to many the first introduction to Imperial China. But what did the Imperial departure really mean to China? And what did it mean to Beijing? How is Puyi remembered today? Does his legacy in fact hold any significance at all? “Life of Puyi” is a talk about the last emperor of China, based on research conducted by Beijing Postcards. Join us at 7:30pm December 17 at the Bookworm. Admission is 75 RMB for non-members and 65 RMB for members (Includes a free drink)

City of Segregation

Event date:
07-30-2017 02:30 PM
Event End Date:
07-30-2017 04:00 PM
Capacity:
Unlimited
Individual Price:
¥100.00
Location:
The Hutong

Did you know that Beijing was once a deeply segregated city? People from the South of town could not freely marry people from the Northern part. This did not change till 1902.

Beijing during the Qing dynasty was a city under occupation. Around the palace lived the Imperial clan and the soldiers of the 8 banners, and below them the Chinese civilians. These two societies were divided both by law and physically by Walls and gates.

The reason for this was that the rulers were afraid of losing their ethnic identity. Because the Qing rulers all belonged to a conglomeration of tribes called the Manchu’s. These were people of the plains that culturally were very different from the Han-Chinese. The women of the Manchu’s for instance did not bind their feet and rode horses. Culturally the Manchu’s felt a much closer bund to the Mongolian’s. But despite their vigorous efforts the virtues of nomadic living eventually proved difficult to preserve…

“City of Segregation” is the story of how the Manchu’s occupied the Capital of Beijing for an impressive almost 280 years, how they changed the city and still strongly helped influence our notion of “old Beijing” today. Very likely the ancestors, of your small talking bird-raising Beijing neighbor, originally belonged to a whiplashing nomadic people of the plains.

 

City of Segregation

  • Date: Sunday, July 30th
  • Time: 2:30pm – 4:00pm
  • Cost: 100 RMB, 50 RMB for members, includes a drink

www.thehutong.com

events@thehutong.com

Midnight in Peking

Event date:
09-30-2017 06:30 PM
Event End Date:
09-30-2017 09:00 PM
Capacity:
Unlimited
Individual Price:
¥380.00

A walk created by Beijing Postcards: